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Has anyone ever had to jack up the van by the roadside?

G

geotim

Messages
2
Location
Yorks
Vehicle
T6 Coast 204
Some quick tips:

Firstly, if you have a contract with a recovery company, get them to come and change your wheel - especially if you are on a busy road or motorway.

If you are going to DIY...

1. The VW provided jack is designed to lift an empty van. One that’s been kitted out as a camper van is overweight for the standard jack, so get yourself something appropriate like a 4t bottle jack - make sure you know where the jacking points are and have some wood planking or plastic pads if you need them.
2. If you cannot access your spare wheel because the van is too low, perhaps check your springs. If you have installed a ‘lowering kit’ then it’s your own look out!
3. A padlock on the underslung spare wheel is a good idea.
4. If the wheels are ‘stuck’ on to the hubs, try this; loosen off the wheel nuts a bit, but do not remove them. Just loosen them a little bit. Lower the van back onto the wheels and rock the van - that will “pop” the wheel loose from the hub. Jack it up again and change your wheel.
 
Velma's Dad

Velma's Dad

Top Poster
VIP Member
Messages
2,620
Location
Buckinghamshire
Vehicle
T5 SE 180
Some quick tips:

Firstly, if you have a contract with a recovery company, get them to come and change your wheel - especially if you are on a busy road or motorway.

If you are going to DIY...

1. The VW provided jack is designed to lift an empty van. One that’s been kitted out as a camper van is overweight for the standard jack, so get yourself something appropriate like a 4t bottle jack - make sure you know where the jacking points are and have some wood planking or plastic pads if you need them.
2. If you cannot access your spare wheel because the van is too low, perhaps check your springs. If you have installed a ‘lowering kit’ then it’s your own look out!
3. A padlock on the underslung spare wheel is a good idea.
4. If the wheels are ‘stuck’ on to the hubs, try this; loosen off the wheel nuts a bit, but do not remove them. Just loosen them a little bit. Lower the van back onto the wheels and rock the van - that will “pop” the wheel loose from the hub. Jack it up again and change your wheel.
Agree with all that except that the last bit is not guaranteed to work unless the 'stick on' is quite mild. If the wheel is properly stuck on you may try all the tips like driving the van in a circle on loose wheel nuts, rocking it etc etc and hitting the wheel from behind (take great care with that if it's on a jack) but still without success. May eventually require a large lump hammer and a block of wood or get an axle stand under there then arm wrestle it bit by bit. I've seen an RAC van man struggle for 10 mins to get one off.

Answer is to ensure you've put a smear of copper grease or similar in the mating surfaces.
 
D

Doug Curran

VIP Member
Messages
9
Location
Victoria, Canada
Vehicle
T5 SE 174
As a new Cali owner I found all of the above helpful. My own experience has equally to get rid of locking wheel nuts - tire shops often fail to replace them in the glove box and then you're hooped in the emergency. When changing wheels over always give the hub serfaces a wipe around with a Scotchbrite pad to clean and remove corrosion residue and then a light smear of waterproof silicone grease. A 18" breaker bar with short extension and proper 6-sided socket - not a 12! is essential. And lastly either torque your own wheels or ensure that the tire shop doesn't just ram them up with an air gun.
 
G

geotim

Messages
2
Location
Yorks
Vehicle
T6 Coast 204
Agree with all that except that the last bit is not guaranteed to work unless the 'stick on' is quite mild. If the wheel is properly stuck on you may try all the tips like driving the van in a circle on loose wheel nuts, rocking it etc etc and hitting the wheel from behind (take great care with that if it's on a jack) but still without success. May eventually require a large lump hammer and a block of wood or get an axle stand under there then arm wrestle it bit by bit. I've seen an RAC van man struggle for 10 mins to get one off.

Answer is to ensure you've put a smear of copper grease or similar in the mating surfaces.
Grease is the answer, but not to the original question... if they’re already stuck you can’t get the grease on.

I’ve never had to resort to anything more than the tips I’ve shown above, even on ‘works’ vehicles. I grease my own hubs with a bit of copper slip, but the other vehicles I’ve driven haven’t had that treatment. Loosen the nuts and rock it has always been enough. If two tonnes of vehicle won’t shift it, a braying with a hammer will do bugger all.
 
Velma's Dad

Velma's Dad

Top Poster
VIP Member
Messages
2,620
Location
Buckinghamshire
Vehicle
T5 SE 180
As a new Cali owner I found all of the above helpful. My own experience has equally to get rid of locking wheel nuts - tire shops often fail to replace them in the glove box and then you're hooped in the emergency. When changing wheels over always give the hub serfaces a wipe around with a Scotchbrite pad to clean and remove corrosion residue and then a light smear of waterproof silicone grease. A 18" breaker bar with short extension and proper 6-sided socket - not a 12! is essential. And lastly either torque your own wheels or ensure that the tire shop doesn't just ram them up with an air gun.
I tend to agree about dispensing with the lockable nuts. They can be hard to release using the wheel brace (wrench) supplied with the van as its curved shape tends to make it slip off the nut easily, which is another good reason to carry a more suitable implement as you suggest.

All this might be tending to put people off from trying to change a wheel on their Cali. But it's not necessarily as hard as it sounds. Unless at the side of a very busy road I'd personally rather change the wheel myself in about 15 mins and get on my way, than sit around for ages for AA or whoever.
 
J

John Rowson

Messages
9
Location
Solihull, West Midlands
Vehicle
T5 SE 140
I was just wondering if anyone had any experience of this. Had a puncture?
Knowing where the jack is on back of bench, wheel under the van, locking nut on it, different locking nut on the wheels, whenever I think about it I imagine it would be one of the worst days of my life. Particularly if raining.
If I ever drive over glass, I wince.
Oh and I forgot, I had the spare stolen years ago and I bought a replacement on eBay. I hope I got the correct size. But that worries me also!
I've had a few problems changing a wheel. These are my tips. On the comfort of your own drive remove the wheels and copper grease the hub spigots. You might need a big piece of wood to 'persuade' the wheels off if they haven't been off for a while. Obviously be careful. Best not do this just relying on the vehicle jack. Don't rely on the wheel brace supplied with the van. Invest in a quality socket and breaker bar. This should help if your wheel bolts have been gunned on too tight. Also the superior fit will make it easier on the locking key/locking bolt. I found it a struggle (I had the VW lowered springs) to remove the spare (I think I'm getting too old!). In fact if I had a puncture on the motorway I would not change the wheel on the hard shoulder. Put the hazard lights on and drive slowly to the next junction. It might wreck the tyre but at least you are less likely to be hit by a wandering 45 ton truck. The police don't stay on the hard shoulder if they can help it. They have seen too many nasty accidents. Hate to say it but a pump and go kit might be a handy option.
 
D

dave6779

VIP Member
Messages
52
Location
Wigan, UK
Vehicle
T6 Ocean 204
I was just wondering if anyone had any experience of this. Had a puncture?
Knowing where the jack is on back of bench, wheel under the van, locking nut on it, different locking nut on the wheels, whenever I think about it I imagine it would be one of the worst days of my life. Particularly if raining.
If I ever drive over glass, I wince.
Oh and I forgot, I had the spare stolen years ago and I bought a replacement on eBay. I hope I got the correct size. But that worries me also!
Yes, twice unfortunately. First time I was driving behind a breakdown vehicle and piece of sharp metal fell off, couldn’t swerve or brake quick enough. managed to get to the works car park, couldn’t get the wheel with the flat tyre off after getting the spare out so had to call the aa, he brought a very large hammer. Other than that it wasn’t too bad.

Second time in the rain in my close (nail through the tyre) thankfully having just done this 3 months before I knew the procedure. Not too bad tbh but got soaked. The jack etc is actually ok. I wouldn’t be comfortable retrieving the toolkit on a busy road though.
 
SusiBus

SusiBus

2-pedal power Peppa Pig trike
Lifetime VIP Member
Messages
957
Location
Watford,Herts
Vehicle
T6 Ocean 204 4Motion
Three rear wheel punctures todate. It's a lot quicker doing it yourself rather than waiting for a recovery, but I suggest the following.
Take the wheels off, or have them taken off. Then have a THIN layer of copper slip applied to the mating surfaces.
Then have a practice at home to familiarise yourself with the procedure. Care must be exercised, because it potentially can be a dangerous procedure.
The most difficult bit it is replacing the punctured wheel in the rack. So the best idea is to leave it to a more convenient time.
 
Elly Swanson

Elly Swanson

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1,626
Location
East Midlands
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T6 Ocean 150
That question makes me chuckle every time I see it in the forum list . Ooh, er misses!
 

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