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For Autoglym Aqua Wax fans - a tip, plus life advice!

Hawthorn37

Hawthorn37

Retired, and working hard at it
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Location
Derbyshire, United Kingdom
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T6.1 Ocean 150
It’s lovely now that (at last) we’re breaking out of winter and the days are warming up nicely. So today I decided that, ahead of a holiday in the van, it should receive a wash and a shine. (Nb. Our outings this summer are going to be a bit limited, and probably last minute. So nice to have the van shining! Read on, to Tip No.2). I’m a big fan of Autoglym products, including Aqua Wax. As the name suggests, it’s a wax you spray on to a wet vehicle. It’s a wonder product, making drying streak free a doddle. Except that is when it’s hot, and the vehicle dries before you’ve had chance to apply it and dry it off. To be fair, it’s a bit of a pain then, and you continue to find dots of unpolished Aqua Wax all over, until you wash it again!

So here is Tip No.1. Get a spray bottle, and fill with 80% water and 20% Aqua Wax. Even on a bone dry vehicle on a hot day, you can spray and dry with a microfibre cloth as you go without leaving a trace. The end result is just the same as neat Aqua Wax, but I guess the hygroscopic qualities won’t be as long lasting. But it’s quick! I carry a bottle with me in the van, for a mid tour spruce up if needed. I first tried a 50/50 mix but that didn’t work. 80/20 is fine, and tested in 40deg C in France. And whilst this tip will just save you wasted minutes of polishing, the next one could be a life saver.

So, to Tip No.2, and why our touring is being restricted this year. Guys - if you’re over 50 you‘d be wise to have a PSA test every once in a while (IMO). If you are over 60, you should Definitely get a PSA test regularly - in my (non medically qualified, but born out of experience) opinion. This tip might just save your life (I hope).

If anyone has concerns about either tip, feel free to DM me.

IMG_7340.jpeg
 
It’s lovely now that (at last) we’re breaking out of winter and the days are warming up nicely. So today I decided that, ahead of a holiday in the van, it should receive a wash and a shine. (Nb. Our outings this summer are going to be a bit limited, and probably last minute. So nice to have the van shining! Read on, to Tip No.2). I’m a big fan of Autoglym products, including Aqua Wax. As the name suggests, it’s a wax you spray on to a wet vehicle. It’s a wonder product, making drying streak free a doddle. Except that is when it’s hot, and the vehicle dries before you’ve had chance to apply it and dry it off. To be fair, it’s a bit of a pain then, and you continue to find dots of unpolished Aqua Wax all over, until you wash it again!

So here is Tip No.1. Get a spray bottle, and fill with 80% water and 20% Aqua Wax. Even on a bone dry vehicle on a hot day, you can spray and dry with a microfibre cloth as you go without leaving a trace. The end result is just the same as neat Aqua Wax, but I guess the hygroscopic qualities won’t be as long lasting. But it’s quick! I carry a bottle with me in the van, for a mid tour spruce up if needed. I first tried a 50/50 mix but that didn’t work. 80/20 is fine, and tested in 40deg C in France. And whilst this tip will just save you wasted minutes of polishing, the next one could be a life saver.

So, to Tip No.2, and why our touring is being restricted this year. Guys - if you’re over 50 you‘d be wise to have a PSA test every once in a while (IMO). If you are over 60, you should Definitely get a PSA test regularly - in my (non medically qualified, but born out of experience) opinion. This tip might just save your life (I hope).

If anyone has concerns about either tip, feel free to DM me.

View attachment 123024
I know little regarding Tip 1. As for Tip 2 I whole heartedly agree. I know from experience and an early testing regime is vital. 3 yrs + clear now - good luck to you sir.
 
Yes had my first PSA last year and thankfully all ok, lost my Dad to prostrate cancer a couple of years ago. So important to get tested, particularly if you have family history.
 
Also worth getting blood pressure checked.

Ive had an exciting couple of months, rushed to Moorfields to have a retina re-attached as an emergency to be told that the retina was the least of my worries.

Apparently a BP of 275 over 175 is nothing like normal. I now have 28 tablets a day, lower blood pressure and a cardiologist who is amazed I'm still alive.


As for tip one - I save even more time by not bothering to wash the van. too much other stuff to be getting on with.
 
Also worth getting blood pressure checked.

Ive had an exciting couple of months, rushed to Moorfields to have a retina re-attached as an emergency to be told that the retina was the least of my worries.

Apparently a BP of 275 over 175 is nothing like normal. I now have 28 tablets a day, lower blood pressure and a cardiologist who is amazed I'm still alive.


As for tip one - I save even more time by not bothering to wash the van. too much other stuff to be getting on with.
Thats off the scale BP, have mine checked when I have annual bloods.
 
I have one of the withings battery BP cuffs. Pretty accurate and the app records everything along with weight and body composition from the scales.
 
Along a similar vein, early colonoscopies are potentially lifesavers too. Incidences are occurring at increasingly younger ages. In the past 50 was the age to have the first although for some groups 45 might be a safer option. I've had 2, one virtual and the other a full fat endoscopic exam. The latter picked up a couple of flat polyps that were removed. Nothing cancerous or precancerous luckily. The trouble with colon cancer, just like pancreatic (the cancer that took my 80 year old mother 2 years ago) is that by the time symptoms occur the cancer has like spread to other structures and the prognosis is extremely poor. Get tested.
 
I concur totally with Tip 2 - my father had it and so last year after getting up most nights I saw my dr. Brilliant chap and did PSA - appeared ok but I agreed to a DRE. Little embarrassing but who cares when it's your health. Thankfully all perfectly normal; he was going to refer me to a continence nurse until I told him I was married to one!! Was told by wife to drink more clear fluids and less tea..........hey presto less getting up at night - I'm 66! BTW yes just as important get BP done; mine was at top of normal end with 140/80 but has now dropped - probably caused by loss of mother couple of months back and a stressful project just finished

Can't emphasise Tip 2 enough as have lost 2 good friends to prostate cancer and neither had any symptoms till too late. Another friend had test in Feb and miraculously got in for a precationary protectomy and has recovered incredibly well - he's 60.
 
I‘m glad you were okay @Norfolk Jim, and thanks for your input. As you rightly say, most men, about 80% !!, have no physical symptoms at all. The PSA test, along with a ‘DRE’ (doctors finger probe), is currently the only means of finding out. Even the DRE on its own is no guarantee of catching it early. My blood test results were quite a shock, and the start of a scary rollercoaster ride.
 
Along a similar vein, early colonoscopies are potentially lifesavers too. Incidences are occurring at increasingly younger ages. In the past 50 was the age to have the first although for some groups 45 might be a safer option. I've had 2, one virtual and the other a full fat endoscopic exam. The latter picked up a couple of flat polyps that were removed. Nothing cancerous or precancerous luckily. The trouble with colon cancer, just like pancreatic (the cancer that took my 80 year old mother 2 years ago) is that by the time symptoms occur the cancer has like spread to other structures and the prognosis is extremely poor. Get tested.
I agree @Corradobrit. I’ve also had a couple, with a similar outcome to you. My wife in an endoscopy nurse, and has been very keen to get me checked whenever I’ve had issues. She’s seen it all.
 
It’s lovely now that (at last) we’re breaking out of winter and the days are warming up nicely. So today I decided that, ahead of a holiday in the van, it should receive a wash and a shine. (Nb. Our outings this summer are going to be a bit limited, and probably last minute. So nice to have the van shining! Read on, to Tip No.2). I’m a big fan of Autoglym products, including Aqua Wax. As the name suggests, it’s a wax you spray on to a wet vehicle. It’s a wonder product, making drying streak free a doddle. Except that is when it’s hot, and the vehicle dries before you’ve had chance to apply it and dry it off. To be fair, it’s a bit of a pain then, and you continue to find dots of unpolished Aqua Wax all over, until you wash it again!

So here is Tip No.1. Get a spray bottle, and fill with 80% water and 20% Aqua Wax. Even on a bone dry vehicle on a hot day, you can spray and dry with a microfibre cloth as you go without leaving a trace. The end result is just the same as neat Aqua Wax, but I guess the hygroscopic qualities won’t be as long lasting. But it’s quick! I carry a bottle with me in the van, for a mid tour spruce up if needed. I first tried a 50/50 mix but that didn’t work. 80/20 is fine, and tested in 40deg C in France. And whilst this tip will just save you wasted minutes of polishing, the next one could be a life saver.

So, to Tip No.2, and why our touring is being restricted this year. Guys - if you’re over 50 you‘d be wise to have a PSA test every once in a while (IMO). If you are over 60, you should Definitely get a PSA test regularly - in my (non medically qualified, but born out of experience) opinion. This tip might just save your life (I hope).

If anyone has concerns about either tip, feel free to DM me.

View attachment 123024
Tip no 1 no need to mix the wax and water try just spray water over the dry surface and polish.
 
It’s lovely now that (at last) we’re breaking out of winter and the days are warming up nicely. So today I decided that, ahead of a holiday in the van, it should receive a wash and a shine. (Nb. Our outings this summer are going to be a bit limited, and probably last minute. So nice to have the van shining! Read on, to Tip No.2). I’m a big fan of Autoglym products, including Aqua Wax. As the name suggests, it’s a wax you spray on to a wet vehicle. It’s a wonder product, making drying streak free a doddle. Except that is when it’s hot, and the vehicle dries before you’ve had chance to apply it and dry it off. To be fair, it’s a bit of a pain then, and you continue to find dots of unpolished Aqua Wax all over, until you wash it again!

So here is Tip No.1. Get a spray bottle, and fill with 80% water and 20% Aqua Wax. Even on a bone dry vehicle on a hot day, you can spray and dry with a microfibre cloth as you go without leaving a trace. The end result is just the same as neat Aqua Wax, but I guess the hygroscopic qualities won’t be as long lasting. But it’s quick! I carry a bottle with me in the van, for a mid tour spruce up if needed. I first tried a 50/50 mix but that didn’t work. 80/20 is fine, and tested in 40deg C in France. And whilst this tip will just save you wasted minutes of polishing, the next one could be a life saver.

So, to Tip No.2, and why our touring is being restricted this year. Guys - if you’re over 50 you‘d be wise to have a PSA test every once in a while (IMO). If you are over 60, you should Definitely get a PSA test regularly - in my (non medically qualified, but born out of experience) opinion. This tip might just save your life (I hope).

If anyone has concerns about either tip, feel free to DM me.

View attachment 123024

It’s lovely now that (at last) we’re breaking out of winter and the days are warming up nicely. So today I decided that, ahead of a holiday in the van, it should receive a wash and a shine. (Nb. Our outings this summer are going to be a bit limited, and probably last minute. So nice to have the van shining! Read on, to Tip No.2). I’m a big fan of Autoglym products, including Aqua Wax. As the name suggests, it’s a wax you spray on to a wet vehicle. It’s a wonder product, making drying streak free a doddle. Except that is when it’s hot, and the vehicle dries before you’ve had chance to apply it and dry it off. To be fair, it’s a bit of a pain then, and you continue to find dots of unpolished Aqua Wax all over, until you wash it again!

So here is Tip No.1. Get a spray bottle, and fill with 80% water and 20% Aqua Wax. Even on a bone dry vehicle on a hot day, you can spray and dry with a microfibre cloth as you go without leaving a trace. The end result is just the same as neat Aqua Wax, but I guess the hygroscopic qualities won’t be as long lasting. But it’s quick! I carry a bottle with me in the van, for a mid tour spruce up if needed. I first tried a 50/50 mix but that didn’t work. 80/20 is fine, and tested in 40deg C in France. And whilst this tip will just save you wasted minutes of polishing, the next one could be a life saver.

So, to Tip No.2, and why our touring is being restricted this year. Guys - if you’re over 50 you‘d be wise to have a PSA test every once in a while (IMO). If you are over 60, you should Definitely get a PSA test regularly - in my (non medically qualified, but born out of experience) opinion. This tip might just save your life (I hope).

If anyone has concerns about either tip, feel free to DM me.

View attachment 123024
I understand the desire to get checked but, it’s complicated! PSA is good for monitoring established disease, but it has a high false positive rate (misdiagnosis) and false negative (1 in 7 cancers are missed ) making it a poor tool for screening. Unnecessary tests can lead to surgery with all its potential downsides (incontinence, impotence etc) or false reassurance. On top of this most men with prostrate cancer will not die from it, but from other diseases. The potential harm resulting from “routine” PSA tests is not currently outweighed by the potential benefits, which is why there is no screening program. That said your personal risk may make getting a test worthwhile.
 
Yes but the follow up test - DRE by doctor is a very good indicator for those with no symptoms. My doctor had suggested doing 2 PSA tests a month apart and comparing; apparently this can help with false positives etc (no idea how) but at least I feel happier having everything done. On the flip side I know there are trials ongoing for a new test which so far is looking pretty good. Don't forget as you've said most men don't die from the prostate cancer itself but from it's progression to other areas without symptoms which then cannot be cured
 
Yes but the follow up test - DRE by doctor is a very good indicator for those with no symptoms. My doctor had suggested doing 2 PSA tests a month apart and comparing; apparently this can help with false positives etc (no idea how) but at least I feel happier having everything done. On the flip side I know there are trials ongoing for a new test which so far is looking pretty good. Don't forget as you've said most men don't die from the prostate cancer itself but from it's progression to other areas without symptoms which then cannot be cured
Two tests increases reliability, but it is still too poor to be used as a screening test for an average risk man. Adding rectal examination will further increase the chance of picking up a tumour, but only if it’s large enough. PSA testing is easy and cheap, if it were a good way of screening it would be used for screening, it just isn’t good enough for screening asymptomatic, low risk men. Most men with prostate cancer will die of unrelated disease, heart attacks, strokes etc and even old age!
 
Totally agree with Ewanc.

Cockrane Institute says..
“Harms associated with PSA-based screening and subsequent diagnostic evaluations are frequent, and moderate in severity. Overdiagnosis and overtreatment are common and are associated with treatment-related harms. Men should be informed of this and the demonstrated adverse effects when they are deciding whether or not to undertake screening for prostate cancer. Any reduction in prostate cancer-specific mortality may take up to 10 years to accrue; therefore, men who have a life expectancy less than 10 to 15 years should be informed that screening for prostate cancer is unlikely to be beneficial.”

Overdiagnosis and over treatment include those prostate cancers that won’t harm you. The ones that will (harm you) will anyway, whether diagnosed early or late. At present we can’t distinguish harmless from harmful.

Cockrane Institute is non-political non-profit institution based in Oxford that summarises all available evidence. Cochrane is for anyone interested in using high-quality information to make health decisions. Whether you are a clinician, patient or carer, researcher, or policy-maker, Cochrane evidence provides a powerful tool to enhance your healthcare knowledge and decision-making.

DOI - retired Pathologist
 
Totally agree with Ewanc.

Cockrane Institute says..
“Harms associated with PSA-based screening and subsequent diagnostic evaluations are frequent, and moderate in severity. Overdiagnosis and overtreatment are common and are associated with treatment-related harms. Men should be informed of this and the demonstrated adverse effects when they are deciding whether or not to undertake screening for prostate cancer. Any reduction in prostate cancer-specific mortality may take up to 10 years to accrue; therefore, men who have a life expectancy less than 10 to 15 years should be informed that screening for prostate cancer is unlikely to be beneficial.”

Overdiagnosis and over treatment include those prostate cancers that won’t harm you. The ones that will (harm you) will anyway, whether diagnosed early or late. At present we can’t distinguish harmless from harmful.

Cockrane Institute is non-political non-profit institution based in Oxford that summarises all available evidence. Cochrane is for anyone interested in using high-quality information to make health decisions. Whether you are a clinician, patient or carer, researcher, or policy-maker, Cochrane evidence provides a powerful tool to enhance your healthcare knowledge and decision-making.

DOI - retired Pathologist
I’m sorry to disagree. What you’re reporting on is the fundamentally the same as my GP’s advice for the past 4 years, along with Public Health England. You’re told, if anything changes such as wee frequency, flow or urgency, see the doctor for a Digital exam .. and then maybe a PSA. The problem is that most men don’t display ANY of these symptoms. My urology consultant tells me that most men she sees already have an advanced cancer, often stage 4. She believes that men over the age of 60 should get themselves a PSA test, although there is no official screening program.

In terms of the false positives from PSA tests, yes it’s true, it could be a spike, or caused by a UTI etc. however, before any surgery occurs, there are a number of non invasive scans required - MRI, CT, maybe PET scan, bone scan. Biopsies are also conducted, I am told only when the medical lead has done an DSE and confirms a possible issue, along with a high PSA. The biopsy will confirm the type of cancer and staging data.

In my opinion, PSA testing is not a screening program due to the extra pressure on CT scans etc., the availability of which is patchy in the UK and far worse than in comparable countries. This is just my opinion though.

It is really surprising to find so many acquaintances and relatives,, who’ve gone through this. The outcomes have ranged from watch and wait, with regular PSA tests, to surgery required, or more holistic treatment regimes for uncontained cancers.

I’m not trying to spread alarm here, or to repeat any info that hasn’t been provided by someone involved in my care, or those with first hand experience. The purpose of sharing is to raise general awareness, and hopefully help folks to catch this thing as early as possible.
 
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Two tests increases reliability, but it is still too poor to be used as a screening test for an average risk man. Adding rectal examination will further increase the chance of picking up a tumour, but only if it’s large enough. PSA testing is easy and cheap, if it were a good way of screening it would be used for screening, it just isn’t good enough for screening asymptomatic, low risk men. Most men with prostate cancer will die of unrelated disease, heart attacks, strokes etc and even old age!
The issue here is that 80% of men who go on to have a prostate cancer display no symptoms whatsoever. My consultant tells me that men who do have “symptoms” usually don’t have cancer.

It is true that many men who have prostate cancer have a non aggressive type. As such they may receive hormone treatment to reduce the size of the tumour or be put on a watch and wait. But I’d still like to know.

It would be great to have a better, more definitive test, and I’m sure it’s being worked on. But for now this PSA test is all there is. And, in my personal view, not enough men are getting one.
 
The purpose of my original post was to gently raise awareness of prostate cancer diagnosis, and of course maintaining a shiny van!

People may disagree with either or both of my tips, which is fine. Having related my experience, and what I’ve discovered, I’ll leave it there. If you’re male, and of an age, it’s your choice. Someone offered me the same advice about 5 years ago. I ignored it, and went with what my GP advised.

For anyone still wanting to discuss I’m still open to DMs if you need.
 
The purpose of my original post was to gently raise awareness of prostate cancer diagnosis, and of course maintaining a shiny van!

People may disagree with either or both of my tips, which is fine. Having related my experience, and what I’ve discovered, I’ll leave it there. If you’re male, and of an age, it’s your choice. Someone offered me the same advice about 5 years ago. I ignored it, and went with what my GP advised.

For anyone still wanting to discuss I’m still open to DMs if you need.
Raising awareness can only be a good thing. I had no symptoms and only included a PSA test in my annual BUPA check up after watching a BBC documentary on Bill Turnbull. High PSA count led to numerous tests during the pandemic resulting in surgery. I was offered ‘watch and wait’, but given my Gleason score it didn‘t make sense. I persuaded my buddy to at least have a check up and he too got caught, as did his brother. As @Hawthorn37 says; it’s your choice.
 
IMG_6702.PNG Raising awareness is obviously a good thing and I’m glad those posting here have largely positive experiences of PSA testing. But health advice (eg “get tested”) based on individuals’ experiences can be misleading - what works for one may be harmful to 20. That is why we have large controlled studies with statistical analyses.

Cancer Research UK says (2022) “There is no national screening programme for prostate cancer in the UK. This is because there isn’t a reliable test that can pick up prostate cancer that needs treatment at an early stage.” The key words here are “needs treatment“.

The infographic ?above (which is a little out of date but still relevant) shows this point and this webpage does a good job explaining the pitfalls of screening https://news.cancerresearchuk.org/2...en-finding-cancer-can-do-more-harm-than-good/

Unnecessary treatment is associated with significant harmful side effects. More recent and in-depth discussion here https://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k3581
 
Tip 1: Sounds a good tip.
Have you tried AutoGlym Polar seal? You just spray it on via a snow foam lance, I quite like it. Much easier than waxing. Still apply a coat of good old Collinite 845 when I can be bothered.

Tip 2: Absolutely
 
View attachment 123286 Raising awareness is obviously a good thing and I’m glad those posting here have largely positive experiences of PSA testing. But health advice (eg “get tested”) based on individuals’ experiences can be misleading - what works for one may be harmful to 20. That is why we have large controlled studies with statistical analyses.

Cancer Research UK says (2022) “There is no national screening programme for prostate cancer in the UK. This is because there isn’t a reliable test that can pick up prostate cancer that needs treatment at an early stage.” The key words here are “needs treatment“.

The infographic ?above (which is a little out of date but still relevant) shows this point and this webpage does a good job explaining the pitfalls of screening https://news.cancerresearchuk.org/2...en-finding-cancer-can-do-more-harm-than-good/

Unnecessary treatment is associated with significant harmful side effects. More recent and in-depth discussion here https://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k3581
And there’s the Catch-22 right there. No screening so no general testing. Tests occur when men express symptoms , but 80% don’t have symptoms. So most prostate cancers are caught late.
 
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