Buy all your VW California Accessories at the Club Shop Visit Shop


Cyclists: Scourge of the streets?

soulstyledevon

soulstyledevon

VIP Member
Messages
2,517
Vehicle
T6 Ocean 204
Let’s put the Climate issue to one side and face up to another big big issue.
Fatties. They are everywhere and a massive burden on the NHS and the economy.
Just a brisk cycle ride each day would make a massive impact.


Whilst climate change is an issue these cyclical changes have been taking place for aeons long before green house gasses came along, so it could well be that our contribution is not as effective as is being portrayed, and therefore changing our ways and all hopping on bicycles will not bring significant change.
 
GrannyJen

GrannyJen

goody goody 2shoes
Moderator
Top Poster
Lifetime VIP Member
Messages
7,487
Location
West Sussex
Vehicle
T6 Ocean 204 4Motion
Let’s put the Climate issue to one side and face up to another big big issue.
Fatties. They are everywhere and a massive burden on the NHS and the economy.
Just a brisk cycle ride each day would make a massive impact.
I volunteer as an activity advocate for my local health group. The NHIR has published data that shows that cessation of activity in the 70-75 age group, my age group, is the highest of any group, almost like "I've done my three score and ten, time to put my feet up" when it is more necessary than ever to put those feet to work.

I just despair.

I introduce them to the local gym, the desultory way even a simple walk on a very slow moving treadmill is approached is heartbreaking: we have a bike loan scheme and a local cycling group offers to help: It's like riding into a, brick wall. We have organised walks on Thursday mornings, flat, by the sea, gorgeous, but by kilometre 1.5 the first cafe is reached and that's it. Butt on a bench refusing to get off the bench.

The pills some of these people are taking is horrifying. Cholesterol, non-diabetic blood sugar and blood pressure are the main ones. Diabetes 2 the next pill of choice. Arthritis the next .....

In many cases I do feel extra persuasion or incentives are needed.
 
soulstyledevon

soulstyledevon

VIP Member
Messages
2,517
Vehicle
T6 Ocean 204
We must teach the next generation on how to eat properly and the importance of staying active.

I see some of my neighbours drive to the shops. It’s a 15min walk, 4 min cycle ride.
It’s usually faster to ride in than drive, I can’t get my head round it...?
It’s shear laziness and it does sadden me somewhat.
 
A

Alistair Hardy

Messages
22
Location
East Anglia
Vehicle
T5 SE 180
Let’s put the Climate issue to one side and face up to another big big issue.
Fatties. They are everywhere and a massive burden on the NHS and the economy.
Just a brisk cycle ride each day would make a massive impact.
You are absolutely spot on and any way of improving the fitness of the nation is to be applauded and cycling is up there with the best
But the original post referred to the way cyclists behave when interacting with other road users and just because they are keeping fit does not take away their obligation to ride abide by the rules and remain civil and courteous. Many do not they head off on a mission believing they have priority over everyone else on the streets.
 
Borris

Borris

Top Poster
VIP Member
Messages
2,935
Location
Canterbury
Vehicle
T6 Beach 150
The mass "Ride Out" seems to becoming rather too popular amongst younger cyclists in some areas. The idea seems to be to ride on mass around a town or city flouting as many rules as possible and causing as much disruption as they can. This form of low grade urban terrorism appears to be the latest manifestation of the so called "scourge".


News clips and video footage of this happening in Cities started to appear some time ago. The only difference that I can see is that the riders now appear to be much younger.

So riding badly without due care and consideration for others or for the rules of the road is not just the preserve of the selfish, pig headed, cycling anarchist, it's now been passed down to the next generation. Still at least the little dears are keeping fit!

Before anyone starts spitting bullets, my view is that the vast majority of cyclists do ride sensibly and follow the rules and that's to be applauded but my impression is that the numbers that don't are growing.
 
Last edited:
Amarillo

Amarillo

Tom
Top Poster
VIP Member
Messages
5,089
Location
Royal Borough of Greenwich
Vehicle
T6 Beach 150
The mass "Ride Out" seems to becoming rather too popular amongst younger cyclists in some areas. The idea seems to be to ride on mass around a town or city flouting as many rules as possible and causing as much disruption as they can. This form of low grade urban terrorism appears to be the latest manifestation of the so called "scourge".


News clips and video footage of this happening in Cities started to appear some time ago. The only difference that I can see is that the riders now appear to be much younger.

So riding badly without due care and consideration for others or for the rules of the road is not just the preserve of the selfish, pig headed, cycling anarchist, it's now been passed down to the next generation. Still at least the little dears are keeping fit!

Before anyone starts spitting bullets, my view is that the vast majority of cyclists do ride sensibly and follow the rules and that's to be applauded but my impression is that the numbers that don't are growing.
You ain't seen nothing...


Quite probably the most selfish and discourteous cycling ever.
 
kaf2546

kaf2546

VIP Member
Messages
133
Location
Inverness
Vehicle
T6 Ocean 204 4Motion
I've driven and cycled loads in 40 years but have never been more nervous as a cyclist than now, maybe it's an age thing but facts are that I get a 'close pass' every time I'm out and regular games of chicken when vehicles seem to accelerate towards me on a single track road ignoring the passing place. If I get a chance to speak to said driver I enquire 'why are you trying to kill me?'

Saw a good editorial in our bike club mag though:

“There is so much negative stuff in the media and on TV about the apparent ‘war’ between cyclists and motorised vehicles the truth is becoming distorted (Channel 5). Most people are reasonable and considerate, so do not believe the hype. The best way to change the conversation is by positive reinforcement. Motorists show me acts of kindness every day, giving way, passing with plenty of room, sometimes a friendly wave. When people are friendly or behave well, give them a cheery wave or thumbs up. Wave drivers past when they are nervous of passing on country roads (when safe to do so). On really narrow roads occasionally pulling over does no harm. When people act like muppets ignore them, do nothing. Positive reinforcement will do more good than any fist waving at the bad minority.”
 
pjm-84

pjm-84

VIP Member
Messages
1,024
Vehicle
T5 SE 180
Interesting post on STW (cyclists forum).

Unanimous self condemnation of experienced MTBs on a shared path who experience a close miss with oncoming pedestrians on a blind corner (I think its now been cut from the video so cant comment). However its good to say that the "indefensible" is not defended by a group with the same interest.
 
Borris

Borris

Top Poster
VIP Member
Messages
2,935
Location
Canterbury
Vehicle
T6 Beach 150
"Cyclists aren’t the ‘scourge of the streets’. They are mothers, fathers, grandparents and children all doing their bit to make Britain a healthier, greener and more liveable place".

If only that were true! The reality is that most might be but "all" are definitely not.
 
A

aileron346

VIP Member
Messages
159
Location
North Yorkshire
"Cyclists aren’t the ‘scourge of the streets’. They are mothers, fathers, grandparents and children all doing their bit to make Britain a healthier, greener and more liveable place".

If only that were true! The reality is that most might be but "all" are definitely not.
The point he’s making is that cyclists are people of all sorts - he’s digging at the prejudice (grossly displayed by that cheap TV prog.) which takes individual bad behaviour and attributes it to the whole group.
 
Borris

Borris

Top Poster
VIP Member
Messages
2,935
Location
Canterbury
Vehicle
T6 Beach 150
The point he’s making is that cyclists are people of all sorts - he’s digging at the prejudice (grossly displayed by that cheap TV prog.) which takes individual bad behaviour and attributes it to the whole group.
Yes, I'm aware of the point he's making. I did say that most cyclists are behaving as he described but that individual bad behaviour is now so wide spread that it cannot be dismissed so lightly.
 
P

Paul Karas

VIP Member
Messages
10
Location
Chichester
Vehicle
T6 Ocean 204
Oh Borris - individual bad behaviour is there in drivers, motor cyclists, walkers, horse riders, bus drivers, taxi drivers and even mobility scooter "drivers" and especially the more gigantic motor homes and caravans who block up narrow single track roads. Cyclists are no worse - and in many cases better as in the case of an accident they are normally the ones who come off much worse.
I suggest a visit to Holland or, say, Berlin to see what a cycling friendly city could be like and then compare it with places like Bristol, London or Glasgow ( Pollokshaws road is something 'special' on a wet and windy evening in November). And then do something like try to take a bike on a train or two - I dispair...
 
Moz Williams

Moz Williams

Messages
108
Vehicle
T5 SE 140
I've driven and cycled loads in 40 years but have never been more nervous as a cyclist than now, maybe it's an age thing but facts are that I get a 'close pass' every time I'm out and regular games of chicken when vehicles seem to accelerate towards me on a single track road ignoring the passing place. If I get a chance to speak to said driver I enquire 'why are you trying to kill me?'

Saw a good editorial in our bike club mag though:

“There is so much negative stuff in the media and on TV about the apparent ‘war’ between cyclists and motorised vehicles the truth is becoming distorted (Channel 5). Most people are reasonable and considerate, so do not believe the hype. The best way to change the conversation is by positive reinforcement. Motorists show me acts of kindness every day, giving way, passing with plenty of room, sometimes a friendly wave. When people are friendly or behave well, give them a cheery wave or thumbs up. Wave drivers past when they are nervous of passing on country roads (when safe to do so). On really narrow roads occasionally pulling over does no harm. When people act like muppets ignore them, do nothing. Positive reinforcement will do more good than any fist waving at the bad minority.”
Wise words indeed. I am a cyclist and I wholeheartedly agree that I am also quite traumatised at the thought of cycling on todays roads . I think the introduction of the mobile device has made driving and cycling far more dangerous than it ever was on it’s own.However if I was to catch up to a driver who shaved my elbow at 40 mph by a few “thou” I don’t think I would be considering much positive reinforcement.
 
Moz Williams

Moz Williams

Messages
108
Vehicle
T5 SE 140
A very interesting thread. But I don’t think the problem is cyclists. The problem is far worse than that. I think society today is getting more selfish and suffering from rampant paranoia and greed and a whole host of negative traits and these manifest themselves in many different ways.
 
Digger

Digger

VIP Member
Messages
1,153
Location
caledonia
Vehicle
T6 Ocean 150
A very interesting thread. But I don’t think the problem is cyclists. The problem is far worse than that. I think society today is getting more selfish and suffering from rampant paranoia and greed and a whole host of negative traits and these manifest themselves in many different ways.
Agree. Society is becoming less tolerant and people seem to be more prone to aggression and a belief they are entitled.
 
Borris

Borris

Top Poster
VIP Member
Messages
2,935
Location
Canterbury
Vehicle
T6 Beach 150
Oh Borris - individual bad behaviour is there in drivers, motor cyclists, walkers, horse riders, bus drivers, taxi drivers and even mobility scooter "drivers" and especially the more gigantic motor homes and caravans who block up narrow single track roads. Cyclists are no worse - and in many cases better as in the case of an accident they are normally the ones who come off much worse.
I suggest a visit to Holland or, say, Berlin to see what a cycling friendly city could be like and then compare it with places like Bristol, London or Glasgow ( Pollokshaws road is something 'special' on a wet and windy evening in November). And then do something like try to take a bike on a train or two - I dispair...
You state the obvious. The fact that some people using other forms of transport are also badly behaved is not in contention. Those responsible also need to moderate their behaviour. However, that wasn't the subject of this thread.

There are plenty of people queuing up to defend the cyclist and I have no problem with that just so long as it is recognised that badly behaved cyclists are becoming a significant issue in some areas. The very fact that there is an ongoing heated debate about this issue backed up by much video evidence suggests that this should at least be acknowledged and not dismissed as being "no worse".
 
Amarillo

Amarillo

Tom
Top Poster
VIP Member
Messages
5,089
Location
Royal Borough of Greenwich
Vehicle
T6 Beach 150
You state the obvious. The fact that some people using other forms of transport are also badly behaved is not in contention. Those responsible also need to moderate their behaviour. However, that wasn't the subject of this thread.

There are plenty of people queuing up to defend the cyclist and I have no problem with that just so long as it is recognised that badly behaved cyclists are becoming a significant issue in some areas. The very fact that there is an ongoing heated debate about this issue backed up by much video evidence suggests that this should at least be acknowledged and not dismissed as being "no worse".
I don’t think the issue is any worse. In fact the whole reason for poor behaviour by cyclists being so noticeable is that it is so rare. Teenagers today are far more likely to be sedentary in front of a games console than terrorising a senior generation on their bikes.
 

HTML

Top