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Unhinged

Amarillo

Amarillo

Tom
Super Poster
VIP Member
Messages
10,084
Location
Royal Borough of Greenwich
Vehicle
T6 Beach 150
Time before last, after I'd lowered the roof, I noticed something odd at the rear.
e4ed70c8bbe6917adb74fd0100b23823.jpg

The bellows poking out from the roof at the back.

Further investigation reveals that one of the hinges, designed to bring the bellows into the roof space, has reversed itself.

I can bring the roof down with the bellows into the roof with this somewhat unorthodox lowering technique:
1. Lay on belly on roof bed with foot inside lowering strap;
2. Start to lower roof using foot.
3. Pop miscreant hinge into the inside with hands.
4. Keeping roof partially lowered with foot, wriggle around 180 degrees.
5. Hold onto lowering bar with hands and release foot, taking care not to overbalance and fall between front seats with foot still in lowering loop.
6. Lower roof normally.

Does anyone know a remedy for a bellows hinge that has reversed itself?


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Time before last, after I'd lowered the roof, I noticed something odd at the rear.
e4ed70c8bbe6917adb74fd0100b23823.jpg

The bellows poking out from the roof at the back.

Further investigation reveals that one of the hinges, designed to bring the bellows into the roof space, has reversed itself.

I can bring the roof down with the bellows into the roof with this somewhat unorthodox lowering technique:
1. Lay on belly on roof bed with foot inside lowering strap;
2. Start to lower roof using foot.
3. Pop miscreant hinge into the inside with hands.
4. Keeping roof partially lowered with foot, wriggle around 180 degrees.
5. Hold onto lowering bar with hands and release foot, taking care not to overbalance and fall between front seats with foot still in lowering loop.
6. Lower roof normally.

Does anyone know a remedy for a bellows hinge that has reversed itself?


Follow my blog: www.au-revoir.eu
That issue sounds very unusual and I like your method of sorting it out.

When bringing the roof down on our Beach I usually ask Mrs B to keep an eye on the outside to ensure everything folds in properly. So far we haven't experienced your problem....yet. I was thinking, would it be possible for Mrs Amarillo to poke the rear folding hinge back in as you slowly lower the roof. She could use the awning winding handle or something similar to shove it back in as the roof comes down. I am sure that once it's pushed inwards it should stay in the correct position. Mind you, you would have to be careful not to lower fully until she confirms the poking device is clear otherwise you may cause some damage to the roof. It might just prove to be a less torturous process.
 
I have a bungee, but stopped using it because it hinders the bellow's fabric being tucked behind the securing clip on the T6 Beach.

Perhaps there is some way to fix a mini bungee across the back of the bellows only.


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Use an internal cord to pull the bellows hinge inwards when closing. Elasticated cord would be useful between the rear and front hinge?
 
use your tailgat pole and push hinge in from outside of vehicle as roof is being pulled down. on my SE i lower roof halfway walk round vehicle to make sure it is folding inwards then continue to lower roof.
 
I had this happen once but after pushing it back in from outside it hasn’t happened again


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Pushing it in from the outside is, of course, the sensible option. However, when packing up I generally find it less bothersome if Mrs Amarillo has taken the two Masters Amarillo as far away as possible from the packing up site. If not, I find myself bombarded with questions usually beginning with "why" and "why?" being used as a question of its own. See the poor sign installer photographed just now below.
5a850698c0fe8776cccdd8a17b681ec8.jpg


I am heartened by Matt's experience, and hope the matter resolves itself after a few correct inward folds.

If not, I may well try an internal cord to pull the hinge inward correctly until the matter resolves as Matt has indicated it might.


Follow my blog: www.au-revoir.eu
 
Has lack of use led to the problem ;) ?
 
Poor Amarillo. Must be like coming out of the ladies with your skirt tucked into your knickers at the back.

Glad you've found a work-round Tom.
 
Pushing it in from the outside is, of course, the sensible option. However, when packing up I generally find it less bothersome if Mrs Amarillo has taken the two Masters Amarillo as far away as possible from the packing up site. If not, I find myself bombarded with questions usually beginning with "why" and "why?" being used as a question of its own. See the poor sign installer photographed just now below.
5a850698c0fe8776cccdd8a17b681ec8.jpg


I am heartened by Matt's experience, and hope the matter resolves itself after a few correct inward folds.

If not, I may well try an internal cord to pull the hinge inward correctly until the matter resolves as Matt has indicated it might.


Follow my blog: www.au-revoir.eu
I can see your point about getting your boys out of the way for packing up. Very wise indeed.
I am surprised that you have had issues housing the roof with the elastic cord attached. I've never experienced any issues closing ours and we also have a Brandrup inner liner as well. In fact I find the cord actually helps because it does what it says on the tin and pulls both the canvas and internal liner inwards all around but especially at the front. I then grab hold of this material and the cord through the trap hatch and pull each side inwards whilst closing the roof down. I'm sure the elastic cord would help prevent your issue from reoccurring. Once fully down I then raise each side in turn and stuff everything outwards beyond the overlock clasp ensuring that it's all tucked behind the little sticky up seat belt fabric tab. Then I attach the clasp, ensuring that no material will be trapped in the mechanism, before snapping it shut. Then I attach the security straps and close the roof hatch. It can be a little tight but has never been an issue.
 
Pushing it in from the outside is, of course, the sensible option. However, when packing up I generally find it less bothersome if Mrs Amarillo has taken the two Masters Amarillo as far away as possible from the packing up site. If not, I find myself bombarded with questions usually beginning with "why" and "why?" being used as a question of its own. See the poor sign installer photographed just now below.
5a850698c0fe8776cccdd8a17b681ec8.jpg


I am heartened by Matt's experience, and hope the matter resolves itself after a few correct inward folds.

If not, I may well try an internal cord to pull the hinge inward correctly until the matter resolves as Matt has indicated it might.


Follow my blog: www.au-revoir.eu
I like the internal cord idea. Simple, visual evidence of success by the person putting the roof down and a use for your no longer used bungee. :thumb:thumb
 
I can see your point about getting your boys out of the way for packing up. Very wise indeed.
I am surprised that you have had issues housing the roof with the elastic cord attached. I've never experienced any issues closing ours and we also have a Brandrup inner liner as well. In fact I find the cord actually helps because it does what it says on the tin and pulls both the canvas and internal liner inwards all around but especially at the front. I then grab hold of this material and the cord through the trap hatch and pull each side inwards whilst closing the roof down. I'm sure the elastic cord would help prevent your issue from reoccurring. Once fully down I then raise each side in turn and stuff everything outwards beyond the overlock clasp ensuring that it's all tucked behind the little sticky up seat belt fabric tab. Then I attach the clasp, ensuring that no material will be trapped in the mechanism, before snapping it shut. Then I attach the security straps and close the roof hatch. It can be a little tight but has never been an issue.
I close the roof in the same manner but find it very tight to close, sometimes pulling down with all my very considerable weight to lock it down. Perhaps I should adjust the locking clasps as @flying banana suggested in another thread.

We do leave a double summer duvet in the roof cavity, but removing it makes little or no difference to the ease of locking down the roof. There seems to be plenty of space in the roof cavity. I once left my reading glasses zipped up in the window and they were unharmed after a day squished into the roof.

Odds on favourite for the cause of the hinge reversal is the duvet preventing an inward hinge. My best hope is Matt's experience of this not being an irreversible condition.


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The bungee is 2,000 Km northeast of our current location, but I do have plenty of cord and gaffer tape.


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Ah! Could be a tad tricky using that right now then. Sorry I didn't realise you didn't have it with you. I'm sure your cord and tape will be sufficient.
 
I had the same experience as you and @MattBW in my SE. I used the bungee for the next couple of trips to ensure the hinges folded inwards as they should.

Although you don’t have a bungee, the point is, be careful during the next couple of roof closures to ensure it folds correctly and then I think it will be ok.

In our case, I think we were caught out by the wind as we were too focussed on the front and sides not interacting with the scissor hinges. I checked and there was no visible damage. Hope yours is the same.
 
I close the roof in the same manner but find it very tight to close, sometimes pulling down with all my very considerable weight to lock it down. Perhaps I should adjust the locking clasps as @flying banana suggested in another thread.

We do leave a double summer duvet in the roof cavity, but removing it makes little or no difference to the ease of locking down the roof. There seems to be plenty of space in the roof cavity. I once left my reading glasses zipped up in the window and they were unharmed after a day squished into the roof.

Odds on favourite for the cause of the hinge reversal is the duvet preventing an inward hinge. My best hope is Matt's experience of this not being an irreversible condition.


Follow my blog: www.au-revoir.eu
Yes, l read Flying Banana's post on adjusting the roof catches. I did't know that was possible. It might be worth a try.
As you have said, it's just possible that the duvet might be the cause of your roof issue. We don't leave anything in the roof.
 
Use an internal cord to pull the bellows hinge inwards when closing. Elasticated cord would be useful between the rear and front hinge?

In the meantime you could use a guy rope.


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We have a Reimo roof & it does have an elasticated "waist" at the back. Runs round the back from by the hinges, halfway up. Converter said it was a new design to prevent snagging. Don't know if this helps you but thought I'd say as you were discussing part-bungee.
 
Open the seam on the pocket where the plastic bit is in , take out the plastic bit you seem to call a "hinge" put it back in the other way arround (so it folds back in) sew the seam back .
Once the plastic bit is damaged to much it can be that it's a total loss and twisting it arround might not help.
Sew a cord in on that place on the inside , long enough so you can pull it in while closing the roof standing in front
 
I have a bungee, but stopped using it because it hinders the bellow's fabric being tucked behind the securing clip on the T6 Beach.

I had planned to get one of these too. Maybe not such a good idea.. How much of a hindrance is it? Slight or a big pita?
 
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