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Electric California ( on the way )

Sunstoner

Sunstoner

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The issue of where the materials will come from, on a sustainable basis, needed for e vehicles is still an unknown. The Cobalt, Neodymium, Lithium all present severe environmental problems and they are not going away. These added to the damage already caused by mining iron, aluminium etc. Then, as in an earlier post, where is the electricity (or hydrogen) going to come from. Electric vehicles are great to drive but at the present they are not sustainable - in my view. The science is a long way behind the hype.
I entirely agree with your concerns. I dont see how its viable. Even if the earth was 5 times the size and thus 5 times the resources. Its needs leaving alone. This place needs leaving intact for the generations and generations to come. However, it does awfully feel like the race to get off this rock has begun as the realisation that its too late is sinking in for those in the know.
 
Wildcamper

Wildcamper

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136
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UK
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T5 HighTop
It’s not as though oil doesn’t have it’s own environmental problems, not least of which, global warming.
Oh and the odd war of course.
Every single aspect of human activity causes an environmental problem. Oil = CO2 + extraction damage; materials for e vehicles = extensive environmental damage + elimination of local wild life, materials for existing vehicles = environmental damage, food production = environmental damage. There is no "free" lunch. Somehow human consumption in all its forms needs to be reduced substantially. Nature can deal with CO2 given a chance but that chance will not come if humans continue to cut trees and clear forests, in conjunction with reduced consumption. Reducing the global population by about 2 billion would work!
 
Sunstoner

Sunstoner

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Every single aspect of human activity causes an environmental problem. Oil = CO2 + extraction damage; materials for e vehicles = extensive environmental damage + elimination of local wild life, materials for existing vehicles = environmental damage, food production = environmental damage. There is no "free" lunch. Somehow human consumption in all its forms needs to be reduced substantially. Nature can deal with CO2 given a chance but that chance will not come if humans continue to cut trees and clear forests, in conjunction with reduced consumption. Reducing the global population by about 2 billion would work!
We gotta accept that we're like a plague! All those billions of planets dont stand a chance once we're advanced enough to leave earth under our own steam.
 
WelshGas

WelshGas

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Every single aspect of human activity causes an environmental problem. Oil = CO2 + extraction damage; materials for e vehicles = extensive environmental damage + elimination of local wild life, materials for existing vehicles = environmental damage, food production = environmental damage. There is no "free" lunch. Somehow human consumption in all its forms needs to be reduced substantially. Nature can deal with CO2 given a chance but that chance will not come if humans continue to cut trees and clear forests, in conjunction with reduced consumption. Reducing the global population by about 2 billion would work!
That's the Elephant in the Room, that no one talks about.
 
Bellcrew

Bellcrew

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Lymington
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That's the Elephant in the Room, that no one talks about.
They talk about it all the time, of course the reduction in population is dependant on billions of people accepting their premature deaths, volunteers will be short supply.
 
Nolan

Nolan

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EVs are most probably the future but in this sized vehicle that future might be a little way off and I'm not sure I want to pay a premium for one of the first ones. A range under 100 miles is unlikely to satisfy many van owners (private or commercial).

Be good when it does happen though.
 
Amarillo

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An EV would work well for us as our second car for short trips, but we occasionally cover 1000 miles in a single day in Amarillo. Twelve full electric recharges in one day! No way!!!
 
Wildcamper

Wildcamper

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For a fictional look into the future read "Second Sleep" by Robert Harris. Set 600 years in the future, the world has experienced a catastrophe, population of the UK is 10 million, no cars, no planes, no internet, no electricity the only travel is by horse. The church controlls all aspects of life and death. There are tails of the past where people communicated instantly, were able to travel vast distances in a few hours. The church holds these secrets but no one must find out. Plastic is mined in old dumps. One person is determined to find the truth and find out what the rectangular plastic shapes are that have a sign on the back of an apple with a bite taken out. She is successful but ......? While it is only a story I found it made me think very hard about what is happening on the planet and "could this happen"? Yes it could.

I think this aspect of this thread is getting off topic. No I won't be purchasing an electric vehicle of any sort, a wolf in sheep's clothing. As much as I like driving them.
 
DoctorBob

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Interesting article !
Dodgy science -as is usual from pressure groups apposed to consumer goods and personal transport. E.g. PHEV data is from 2+ years ago. And 60% + of all journeys are under 40 miles - PHEVs would save millions of tonnes in co2 pa on the commute alone I would wager
 
GrumpyGranddad

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For a fictional look into the future read "Second Sleep" by Robert Harris. Set 600 years in the future, the world has experienced a catastrophe, population of the UK is 10 million, no cars, no planes, no internet, no electricity the only travel is by horse. The church controlls all aspects of life and death. There are tails of the past where people communicated instantly, were able to travel vast distances in a few hours. The church holds these secrets but no one must find out. Plastic is mined in old dumps. One person is determined to find the truth and find out what the rectangular plastic shapes are that have a sign on the back of an apple with a bite taken out. She is successful but ......? While it is only a story I found it made me think very hard about what is happening on the planet and "could this happen"? Yes it could.

I think this aspect of this thread is getting off topic. No I won't be purchasing an electric vehicle of any sort, a wolf in sheep's clothing. As much as I like driving them.
Yes, read that book a while back. Enjoyable.
 
WelshGas

WelshGas

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It would seem the Energy Companies are getting concerned.

Energy firms planning to use smart meters to switch off your central heating
Sam Meadows

SMART meters could allow energy networks to switch off central heating systems, under proposals being considered by the watchdog.
The plans, tabled by Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks, would allow distributors to ask the permission of consumers to turn off appliances with high usage, including heat pumps and electric vehicle chargers over fears that mass uptake of these green technologies could overload the energy network.
It would be voluntary and appliances would be switched off for two hours a day maximum, ending after 12 months if a permanent solution had not been found.
SSEN stressed the measures would only be used in emergencies, with customer consent and would only apply to heating systems with a heat pump and not those powered by gas.
A spokesman said: “The proposed modification has been tabled to provide a last-resort contingency measure, protecting the security of customer supplies during an emergency scenario.”
But Peter Earl, an energy expert at switching site Compare the Market, said: “I would have considerable concern about the impact of these measures. I would particularly be concerned about the more vulnerable households.”
He added: “We know there are potential issues coming with meeting peak demand, but the industry has to find solutions to these problems and not expect consumers and households to help.”
An Ofgem spokesman said no decision was expected before next spring and consumer protection would be considered. He said: “We would expect further clarity, including the definition of an emergency situation and how consumer interests would be protected, before this modification is submitted to us for decision
 
Bellcrew

Bellcrew

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It would seem the Energy Companies are getting concerned.

Energy firms planning to use smart meters to switch off your central heating
Sam Meadows

SMART meters could allow energy networks to switch off central heating systems, under proposals being considered by the watchdog.
The plans, tabled by Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks, would allow distributors to ask the permission of consumers to turn off appliances with high usage, including heat pumps and electric vehicle chargers over fears that mass uptake of these green technologies could overload the energy network.
It would be voluntary and appliances would be switched off for two hours a day maximum, ending after 12 months if a permanent solution had not been found.
SSEN stressed the measures would only be used in emergencies, with customer consent and would only apply to heating systems with a heat pump and not those powered by gas.
A spokesman said: “The proposed modification has been tabled to provide a last-resort contingency measure, protecting the security of customer supplies during an emergency scenario.”
But Peter Earl, an energy expert at switching site Compare the Market, said: “I would have considerable concern about the impact of these measures. I would particularly be concerned about the more vulnerable households.”
He added: “We know there are potential issues coming with meeting peak demand, but the industry has to find solutions to these problems and not expect consumers and households to help.”
An Ofgem spokesman said no decision was expected before next spring and consumer protection would be considered. He said: “We would expect further clarity, including the definition of an emergency situation and how consumer interests would be protected, before this modification is submitted to us for decision
We lived in New Zealand in the 70's, the electricity company had a signal it sent down the cable that could turn off the hot water emersion heater when the peak was approached, routine and you never knew when it happened, probably.
 
soulstyledevon

soulstyledevon

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Reducing the global population by about 2 billion would work!
I read something recently that said we are near to Population Peaks.

Especially in Europe and well developed countries, less babies are being born and more women are putting off having children, instead chasing careers and travelling more etc etc.

There was a rough rule 50 years ago, that for every woman on average would have 5.2 children, but that currently stands at less than 2.1 for large parts of Europe and surprisingly China which is the threshold replacement level.

In-fact one expert was quoting a population imbalance within the next 50 years which raises many problems an aging population creates.

If the calculations and trends continue, the world population will peak at 9.7billion mid century and drop to less than 8billion before the century finishes.
 
Wildcamper

Wildcamper

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136
Location
UK
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T5 HighTop
It would seem the Energy Companies are getting concerned.

Energy firms planning to use smart meters to switch off your central heating
Sam Meadows

SMART meters could allow energy networks to switch off central heating systems, under proposals being considered by the watchdog.
The plans, tabled by Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks, would allow distributors to ask the permission of consumers to turn off appliances with high usage, including heat pumps and electric vehicle chargers over fears that mass uptake of these green technologies could overload the energy network.
It would be voluntary and appliances would be switched off for two hours a day maximum, ending after 12 months if a permanent solution had not been found.
SSEN stressed the measures would only be used in emergencies, with customer consent and would only apply to heating systems with a heat pump and not those powered by gas.
A spokesman said: “The proposed modification has been tabled to provide a last-resort contingency measure, protecting the security of customer supplies during an emergency scenario.”
But Peter Earl, an energy expert at switching site Compare the Market, said: “I would have considerable concern about the impact of these measures. I would particularly be concerned about the more vulnerable households.”
He added: “We know there are potential issues coming with meeting peak demand, but the industry has to find solutions to these problems and not expect consumers and households to help.”
An Ofgem spokesman said no decision was expected before next spring and consumer protection would be considered. He said: “We would expect further clarity, including the definition of an emergency situation and how consumer interests would be protected, before this modification is submitted to us for decision
Am I allowed to say "about time too"! In 1995 at an electric and fuel cell automotive symposium I asked where all the electricity and hydrogen was going to come from. I was glared at by the symposium panel and told not to be concerned as it was in hand. I repeated this question at meetings in the UK, EU and USA up until I retired in 2016 - still no answer then! May be the sheep's clothing is starting to fall off the wolf.
 
Wildcamper

Wildcamper

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136
Location
UK
Vehicle
T5 HighTop
I read something recently that said we are near to Population Peaks.

Especially in Europe and well developed countries, less babies are being born and more women are putting off having children, instead chasing careers and travelling more etc etc.

There was a rough rule 50 years ago, that for every woman on average would have 5.2 children, but that currently stands at less than 2.1 for large parts of Europe and surprisingly China which is the threshold replacement level.

In-fact one expert was quoting a population imbalance within the next 50 years which raises many problems an aging population creates.

If the calculations and trends continue, the world population will peak at 9.7billion mid century and drop to less than 8billion before the century finishes.
Do we have that long?
 
Karlos

Karlos

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Fowey
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Just browsing
An EV would work well for us as our second car for short trips, but we occasionally cover 1000 miles in a single day in Amarillo. Twelve full electric recharges in one day! No way!!!
Agreed we often do big mileage in Europe driving 12-14 hours, I would need an EV that could do that. I can clock up 350miles a day at work.
 
Alan Greensall

Alan Greensall

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Tamworth
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T6 Beach 150

Has left me a little conflicted
Great to see all electric van out there but not so good for us diesel owners .
The future is coming ...
with a range of 70miles this is never going to replace deisel engine campers They need to catch up with Tesla. I think 300miles is the minimum thats needed.
 
stephen watson

stephen watson

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224
Location
Cumbria
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T6 Ocean 150
I'm a little confused by Chris's video. I've owned an eGolf for a couple of years, which I absolutely love. Like every electric vehicle I know it is single speed and does not have a normal gearbox. Chris specifically says the Transporter has a DSG gearbox. Is he correct? I find it hard to believe it has more than 1 forward gear.
 
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