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Today, I played Motor Factor Roulette and lost.......again.

Borris

Borris

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Over the many decades since I got my first car I've done much of my own servicing, that is on those vehicles that were outside of the warranty period. In my experience, most servicing is pretty straight forward so providing I pick a nice day and organise myself then things shouldn't be too difficult. However what very often makes the whole process a PITA are the Motor Factors.

Yesterday I decided to take advantage of Black whatsit discount and order the necessary to do an annual service on Mrs Bs motorcar. So having played this game many times before I always check to see if there is any danger of said parts actually fitting the vehicle. I repeated this procedure this morning when I went to collect my order from a well known motor factors that specialise in European cars. "Can you please double check that these parts will all fit that car out there? I said to the young man behind the counter. "Yes mate, the fuel filter can be tricky but there's only one listed so you're ok"

Twas a nice sunny day so out came the tools. All went swimmingly until it came to changing the oil filter. Having jacked up the car, removed the under tray and dropped the oil I discovered that I had again been tucked up. The oil filter was the wrong one. :headbang

Last week I collected the correct discs but for the wrong car and the right box containing the wrong pads. The month before I needed new wipers. That took two trips to get that right. It's never been any different either. You can give them your registration number, make and vehicle model, chassis number, engine number and mothers maiden name but it seens to make little difference. The chances of playing and winning is depressingly low.

That's it rant over. I'll take it back on Monday and join the queue with the other losers.
 
clarinetbcn

clarinetbcn

T5.1 Beach 140
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Over the many decades since I got my first car I've done much of my own servicing, that is on those vehicles that were outside of the warranty period. In my experience, most servicing is pretty straight forward so providing I pick a nice day and organise myself then things shouldn't be too difficult. However what very often makes the whole process a PITA are the Motor Factors.

Yesterday I decided to take advantage of Black whatsit discount and order the necessary to do an annual service on Mrs Bs motorcar. So having played this game many times before I always check to see if there is any danger of said parts actually fitting the vehicle. I repeated this procedure this morning when I went to collect my order from a well known motor factors that specialise in European cars. "Can you please double check that these parts will all fit that car out there? I said to the young man behind the counter. "Yes mate, the fuel filter can be tricky but there's only one listed so you're ok"

Twas a nice sunny day so out came the tools. All went swimmingly until it came to changing the oil filter. Having jacked up the car, removed the under tray and dropped the oil I discovered that I had again been tucked up. The oil filter was the wrong one. :headbang

Last week I collected the correct discs but for the wrong car and the right box containing the wrong pads. The month before I needed new wipers. That took two trips to get that right. It's never been any different either. You can give them your registration number, make and vehicle model, chassis number, engine number and mothers maiden name but it seens to make little difference. The chances of playing and winning is depressingly low.

That's it rant over. I'll take it back on Monday and join the queue with the other losers.
I've learned the hard way to plan to take the part out first and take it with me to buy the replacement.
 
J

Jay gas

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Over the many decades since I got my first car I've done much of my own servicing, that is on those vehicles that were outside of the warranty period. In my experience, most servicing is pretty straight forward so providing I pick a nice day and organise myself then things shouldn't be too difficult. However what very often makes the whole process a PITA are the Motor Factors.

Yesterday I decided to take advantage of Black whatsit discount and order the necessary to do an annual service on Mrs Bs motorcar. So having played this game many times before I always check to see if there is any danger of said parts actually fitting the vehicle. I repeated this procedure this morning when I went to collect my order from a well known motor factors that specialise in European cars. "Can you please double check that these parts will all fit that car out there? I said to the young man behind the counter. "Yes mate, the fuel filter can be tricky but there's only one listed so you're ok"

Twas a nice sunny day so out came the tools. All went swimmingly until it came to changing the oil filter. Having jacked up the car, removed the under tray and dropped the oil I discovered that I had again been tucked up. The oil filter was the wrong one. :headbang

Last week I collected the correct discs but for the wrong car and the right box containing the wrong pads. The month before I needed new wipers. That took two trips to get that right. It's never been any different either. You can give them your registration number, make and vehicle model, chassis number, engine number and mothers maiden name but it seens to make little difference. The chances of playing and winning is depressingly low.

That's it rant over. I'll take it back on Monday and join the queue with the other losers.
That’s amazing it’s a very similar story when fitting parts to gas boilers
 
Borris

Borris

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I've learned the hard way to plan to take the part out first and take it with me to buy the replacement.
I suppose I should do that. My repeated mistake is that I'm not really a planner when it comes to servicing. It's often a spur of the moment thing so I get caught every time. If a service is due and the weather is nice then I'll get the parts and crack on. If the weather is looking even slightly iffy then it's a non starter. I also like to avoid having the vehicle out if action for any longer than necessary.
 
66tim99

66tim99

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Over the many decades since I got my first car I've done much of my own servicing, that is on those vehicles that were outside of the warranty period. In my experience, most servicing is pretty straight forward so providing I pick a nice day and organise myself then things shouldn't be too difficult. However what very often makes the whole process a PITA are the Motor Factors.

Yesterday I decided to take advantage of Black whatsit discount and order the necessary to do an annual service on Mrs Bs motorcar. So having played this game many times before I always check to see if there is any danger of said parts actually fitting the vehicle. I repeated this procedure this morning when I went to collect my order from a well known motor factors that specialise in European cars. "Can you please double check that these parts will all fit that car out there? I said to the young man behind the counter. "Yes mate, the fuel filter can be tricky but there's only one listed so you're ok"

Twas a nice sunny day so out came the tools. All went swimmingly until it came to changing the oil filter. Having jacked up the car, removed the under tray and dropped the oil I discovered that I had again been tucked up. The oil filter was the wrong one. :headbang

Last week I collected the correct discs but for the wrong car and the right box containing the wrong pads. The month before I needed new wipers. That took two trips to get that right. It's never been any different either. You can give them your registration number, make and vehicle model, chassis number, engine number and mothers maiden name but it seens to make little difference. The chances of playing and winning is depressingly low.

That's it rant over. I'll take it back on Monday and join the queue with the other losers.
Given my lack of manual ability I’ve always been comfortable leaving servicing the the experts...until I came on this forum and heard about the lack of value in VW servicing! Nothing more annoying than paying expert prices for an amateur to cock it up!
 
Borris

Borris

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Given my lack of manual ability I’ve always been comfortable leaving servicing the the experts...until I came on this forum and heard about the lack of value in VW servicing! Nothing more annoying than paying expert prices for an amateur to cock it up!
Yes, I agree. These days, if one of our vehicles is out of warranty then the only time it visits the dealer or independent is for things like a cam belt change or something involved. I prefer to do the rest myself and here's an example of why:

My father recently passed away. I am now the custodian of his 2005 Skoda Fabia 1.4 tdi and am keeping it as a sort of pool car for our family to use as it has sentimental value. It isn't worth much but has only done 49000 miles so is worth more as a car than it's monetary value. It doesn't cost much to insure and tax and will do up to 60mpg. Anyway I digress. He owned this car from new and always had it serviced at a local Skoda main dealer. I recently changed the front discs and pads. During this job I discovered several stripped bolts that meant my having to replace several other expensive parts. Since I have receipts for all previous work carried out, this damage could only have been done by some clumsy silver back working at this main dealer. The vehicle was then sent back to it's elderly paying owner with several stripped bolts on the brake and steering systems!! And there's more. There are numerous broken plastc component under the bonnet and elsewhere. My dad rarely worked on this car due to his age so the finger of suspicion also points to the dealer.

If I have any servicing work done I inspect it like a hawk afterwards.
 
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66tim99

66tim99

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Yes, I agree. These days, if one of our vehicles vehicle is out of warranty then the only time it visits the dealer or independent is for things like a cam belt change or something involved. I prefer to do the rest myself and here's an example of why:

My father recently passed away. I am now the custodian of his 2005 Skoda Fabia 1.4 tdi and am keeping it as a sort of pool car for our family to use as it has sentimental value. It isn't worth much but has only done 49000 miles so is worth more as a car than it's monetary value. It doesn't cost much to insure and tax and will do up to 60mpg. Anyway I digress. He owned this car from new and always had it serviced at a local Skoda main dealer. I recently changed the front discs and pads. During this job I discovered several stripped bolts that meant my having to replace several other expensive parts. Since I have receipts for all previous work carried out, this damage could only have been done by some clumsy silver back working at this main dealer. The vehicle was then sent back to it's elderly paying owner with several stripped bolts on the brake and steering systems!! And there's more. There are numerous broken plastc component under the bonnet and elsewhere. My dad rarely worked on this car due to his age so the finger of suspicion also points to the dealer.
Infuriating! Is the moral of the story (for a clumsy incompetent like me) to use the dealer until out of service, then find a good local garage?
 
Borris

Borris

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Infuriating! Is the moral of the story (for a clumsy incompetent like me) to use the dealer until out of service, then find a good local garage?
You will have to have it serviced somewhere. There's no guarantee that a good local garage would handle the job any better or worse than a main agent but normally it should be cheaper. I say normally because sometimes dealer menu pricing can be cheaper. If you have a job e.g cam belt replacement, then best get some quotes from several sources. However for basic servicing, take a look at Youtube and have a go. There are numerous tutorials on a range of service issues on all sorts of vehicles, Transporter range included.

Today's service on Mrs Bs Skoda Superb cost me less than £100. I replaced the fuel filter, air filter, pollen filter, front and rear wipers. Also included will be the oil and filter change which I'll do when I exchange the filter.
 
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flying banana

flying banana

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i've had this issue many times. once i've done my first service with all the hassle i keep a note of all the part numbers ready for next time so only once i get the head ache. this same thing happened with my t6 fuel filter and that parts shop that jim bowen would like insisted they had it right. they were wrong. a pain in the ass when its on your drive way with the oil and filters dropped out for them to say oh yeah, we will order you one for next week. and then its wrong!!!!.stil better than letting those so called 'master techs ' at vw do it though.i wouldn't trust them to change the filter in a dyson hoover properly
 
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Bellcrew

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i've had this issue many times. once i've done my first service with all the hassle i keep a note of all the part numbers ready for next time so only once i get the head ache. this same thing happened with my t6 fuel filter and that parts shop that jim bowen would like insisted they had it right. they were wrong. a pain in the ass when its on your drive way with the oil and filters dropped out for them to say oh yeah, we will order you one for next week. and then its wrong!!!!.stil better than letting those so called 'master techs ' at vw do it though.i wouldn't trust them to change the filter in a dyson hoover properly
There is a Canadian YouTube episode (CBC Marketplace) about using an oil change franchise, the advertised price was $19.99.
The prechecked vehicle was presented by the journalist (both fitted with suitable cameras).
The service guy told them the cheap oil was rubbish so recommended the $29.99 stuff and proceeded to tell the victim that the brake fluid and coolant were both failing and need changing immediately or else.
Final bill was $260, to add insult to injury they were found to have replaced the perfect/correct spec. coolant only from the reservoir with some inferior liquid and did not touch the brake fluid at all.
Of course this never happens in the UK, ever.
 
V

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Having been brought up on a farm, with numerous tractors, a lorry, a land rover and an A35 van, I started doing routine servicing work from about the age of 11. First "big job" (under supervision) was changing the rear brake shoes on the A35.
Even then, the difference between garage/agricultural service prices and the cost of the materials used was an eye opener. In my whole vehicle owning life, I have only ever paid for routine servicing 3 times and that was to my local, well respected garage when time constraints prevented me from doing it.
There is a good feeling about doing it yourself, you know what has been done and you know how much money you have saved.
 
Borris

Borris

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Having been brought up on a farm, with numerous tractors, a lorry, a land rover and an A35 van, I started doing routine servicing work from about the age of 11. First "big job" (under supervision) was changing the rear brake shoes on the A35.
Even then, the difference between garage/agricultural service prices and the cost of the materials used was an eye opener. In my whole vehicle owning life, I have only ever paid for routine servicing 3 times and that was to my local, well respected garage when time constraints prevented me from doing it.
There is a good feeling about doing it yourself, you know what has been done and you know how much money you have saved.
And you know it's been done properly.

As we know, self servicing is not all plain sailing though as problems do occur from time to time that any decent garage could easily resolve but are more challenging at home. Getting round the need for specialist tools comes to mind.

One of the aforementioned stripped items was a front brake caliper guide bolt. The thread had stripped in the hub. The easiest way to resolve that was to order a new hub. I then discovered that a specialist tool was required to remove the wheel bearing and replace it in the new hub. The answer was to order a brand new hub and bearing assembly complete from E bay at £89. That led to a new ABS sensor being required as it couldn't be coaxed from it's previous home in the old hub. Further bolts and bracket were also required to replace the stripped one on the lower ball joint and all because someone hadn't used a torq wrench!

Still most servicing is straight forward and easy to do and as you say, leaves you with a good feeling..
 
V

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As we know, self servicing is not all plain sailing though as problems do occur from time to time that any decent garage could easily resolve but are more challenging at home. Getting round the need for specialist tools comes to mind.

But sometimes unavoidable. Even so their cost can usually be justified on a "one off" basis compared to garage quotes for the work, or if particularly specialist, sometimes hire is possible.
When I was gainfully employed we had a car maintenance club at work where participants loaned or hired for a small fee, various items of specialist equipment. This worked very well, as there was usually someone to advise the nervous novice.
 
ArunAlec

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The buggers try to make DIY difficult though. Cartridge oil filters are a pain to extract without a special tool!
 
Borris

Borris

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But sometimes unavoidable. Even so their cost can usually be justified on a "one off" basis compared to garage quotes for the work, or if particularly specialist, sometimes hire is possible.
I totally agree. I have nothing against buying the right specialist tools. I've also hired specialist tools once or twice as well although not for at least thirty years. I remember hiring a splendid tool for turning cars on there side so that work could easily be carried out underneath.
 
Borris

Borris

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The buggers try to make DIY difficult though. Cartridge oil filters are a pain to extract without a special tool!
If you are talking about those metal screw on canister oil filters, I've taken a screwdriver to them in the past. Make sure you have something underneath to catch the oil then drive the screwdriver right through the filter and out the other side. Then use the screw driver to twist it lose. Nothing like having the right tool for the job!

I've since bought the right tool.
 
ArunAlec

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If you are talking about those metal screw on canister oil filters, I've taken a screwdriver to them in the past. Make sure you have something underneath to catch the oil then drive the screwdriver right through the filter and out the other side. Then use the screw driver to twist it lose. Nothing like having the right tool for the job!

I've since bought the right tool.
My Peugeot has the paper filter that snap fits into a plastic canister, it’s the paper filter that is the challenge. Normally resort to brute force!
 
Borris

Borris

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My Peugeot has the paper filter that snap fits into a plastic canister, it’s the paper filter that is the challenge. Normally resort to brute force!
How should it be removed? Is there some form of special tool?

I've not come across one like that before. All the paper filters that I've changed before have just lifted out.
 

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